Learn about video platforms

Depending on where you need your video, there are different possibilities:

  • Mediasite. You can upload your video to Mediasite using myMediasite. Have a look at the Mediasite page for instructions.
  • Canvas. You can embed your video in your Canvas course. Go to the Canvas support pages for instructions.
  • YouTube. You can upload the video to YouTube, one of the most popular (public) video publishing platforms. You can publish and share your video, embed it in your own pages, and get automatically added subtitles.
  • Vimeo. Similar to YouTube, Vimeo is a video publishing platform. You can publish and share your video, embed it in your own pages or even create a showcase to display several videos at once.
  • UM/UB Collection. You can have the video added to the UB collection (for UB staff only, use the form on Intranet) or the collection of your faculty (get in touch with your faculty video department).

Important considerations:

  • Be aware that “public” videos might not always be ideal. Please think twice before uploading, or asking your students to upload, your video to a public channel.
  • Videos that will be assessed and graded, should be uploaded to Mediasite to facilitate the legal requirement to store graded student products for three or more years.
  • When uploading videos to Mediasite or Vimeo, it is easy to keep using the same (embed) link in your courses or website. If the video requires an update, you can simply upload a new video without changing the (embed) link. This means that the updated version of your video will automatically be visible everywhere. YouTube does not offer this option.

Create a thumbnail

When uploading your video, it can be good to consider creating a thumbnail. The viewers see this image before they click the “play” button on your video. With a thumbnail, you can create more unity when you upload multiple videos on the same subject, or represent your brand in a more professional way. Usually, the thumbnail consists of an inviting picture from the video (inspiring the viewer to actually watch the video), with a catchy title and subtitle. A logo can be added, as well as effects or stickers to catch the viewers’ attention.

Create images with Canva

A great tool to use, to create your video thumbnail, is Canva. This online graphic design tool offers a wide variety of templates, images, fonts and effects to create professional-looking images, posters, social media posts and other media. They offer both a free and a pro package (including more templates and options). You can choose different templates that you can edit to suit your vision. The templates are designed with the right proportions for different media, making it easy to use.

Add metadata

On any platform that you upload your video to, you are asked to fill in a number of boxes to provide information about your video. This ensures that your video can be found easily and can be linked to other videos in the same category. Some of these boxes include the title, description, category/collection and tags. It is important to take the time to fill in these boxes, whether that is on Mediasite, YouTube, Vimeo, or another platform, so that your video can be found, used and re-used by a broad audience. Even when the video is intended for a limited or specific audience, correct and detailed metadata can help them browse your video more efficiently.

Consider video copyright

Videos are protected by copyright, just as texts are. Dutch copyright is a creator’s right that protects any work created by an author. Anyone taking a photo, writing a letter, a drawing or making a video with a camera or smartphone, is considered the creator; the work is automatically protected by copyright. Anyone who wants to copy or distribute the work, needs the creator’s permission. In this context, a license refers to permission. A license or permission can be a long contract or very short statement by the copyright owner granting someone permission to use the material, and under what circumstances.

When in doubt about copyright, please contact one of our specialists at the UM library the copyright specialists at the UM library Copyright Information Point.

Watch the video below to learn about the basics of copyright and video.

How to handle copy and image right

Use the toggles to navigate to the information that you need.

Using existing videos in your classroom or lecture hall

Showing parts of a video

  • It is allowed to show short parts of a video for a non-profit educational purpose, provided that you cite the author.

Showing the entire video

  • Showing an entire video or audio recording is a lecture hall or classroom is allowed under a number of conditions: it is for educational purposes, seen only by students or teachers, is related to the course content or curriculum and is within the physical space of the education institute (i.e lecture hall or classroom). Note that some copyright holders of commercially produced audio-visual materials do require special permission (check documentation or packaging). For instance a Public Video Screening license (PVSL) is a license that can be purchased to cover your school’s staff and students watching. Beware! If guests are invited to a screening then you need to purchase a Single Title Screening Licence (STSL).
Using existing video in your digital learning environment

Showing short parts of a video

  • Short parts of a video may be shared via the digital learning environment (i.e. Canvas). Yes, you are allowed to show short parts of a video for a non-profit educational purpose, provided that you cite the author.

Showing the entire video

  • It is not allowed to show an entire video on the digital learning environment. You need permission from the performers and the third party copyright owners.

Providing links to videos (e.g. YouTube, Vimeo)

  • Yes, linking to videos is permitted, the viewer can watch through streaming without downloading the video. Beware however that the video has been legally put online. Not all videos on YouTube are uploaded with the permission of the copyright holder.
Using an existing video in a registered lecture

Showing parts of the video

  • If you show short parts of a video during a lecture that you record and share through the digital learning environment (i.e. Canvas), you may include the parts of vide. It is allowed to show short parts of a video for a non-profit educational purpose, provided that you cite the creator or copyright owner.

Showing the entire video

  • It is not allowed to show a registration of the entire video on the digital learning environment. You need permission from the performers and the third party copyright owners.

Providing links to videos (e.g. YouTube, Vimeo)

  • If you showed a video in your lecture hall by clicking on a link and the lecture is registered (streaming), this video cannot be included in the lecture registration. The action of recording is considered copying or multiplication of the video. You need permission from the performers and the third party copyright owners.
Using existing images or video or audio fragments in your video clip

Including short parts of a video

  • Short parts of a video may be shared via the digital learning environment (i.e. Canvas). Yes, you are allowed to show short parts of a video, audio or images in your video for a non-profit and educational purpose, provided that you cite the author.

Including the entire video

  • It is not allowed to include an entire video or film in your video. You need permission from the performers and the third party copyright owners.
Rights of the people you film: image rights

Image right of students

  • When registering a lecture or class session, both teacher and students will be visible you need (implicit) permission. A way to get implicit permission is by putting up a paper at the entrance of the door of the lecture hall, indicating the lecture may be registered and requesting students to inform the teacher if they do not wish to be filmed. Their objections need to be reasonable (i.e. invasion of privacy).

Image right of patients

  • If you want to use footage of conversations or other forms of interaction with a patient to your students, you need to obtain explicit permission form the patient to use the footage and under what conditions.

Image rights of students performing in a video

  • People who perform in a video implicitly give you permission to share this with others. It remains highly advisable to ask for explicit and written permission to avoid conflicts about image right and privacy

Creative Commons License

The Creative Commons License (CC license) is designed to make publishing and sharing of copyrighted material easier. Anyone can offer a license for their copyrighted material by placing a web link to the CC-license and CC-icon on their website. The essence of the license is that the maker of a work retains copyright while allowing others to copy, distribute, and make some uses of their work. The icon makes it known what the conditions for the use of material are.

Create your own license at: Creative Commons Choose a License. 

Examples of Creative Commons Licenses

Open the toggles to get information on different examples of CC licenses.

Attribution (CC BY)

CC BY Logo

This license lets others distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon your work, even commercially, as long as they credit you for the original creation. This is the most accommodating of licenses offered. Recommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials.

Attribution-ShareAlike (CC BY-SA)

CC BY-SA Logo

This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work even for commercial purposes, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms. This license is often compared to “copyleft” free and open source software licenses. All new works based on yours will carry the same license, so any derivatives will also allow commercial use.

Attribution-NoDerivs (CC BY-ND)

CC BY-ND logo

This license allows for redistribution, commercial and non-commercial, as long as it is passed along unchanged and in whole, with credit to you.

Attribution-NonCommercial (CC BY-NC)

CC BY-NC logo

This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, and although their new works must also acknowledge you and be non-commercial, they don’t have to license their derivative works on the same terms.

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA)

CC BY-NC-SA logo

This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms.

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)

CC BY-NC-ND logo

This license is the most restrictive of our six main licenses, only allowing others to download your works and share them with others as long as they credit you, but they can’t change them in any way or use them commercially.